Judging Judgments

Charles Horowitz, Judging Judgments, 7 Gonz. L. Rev. 1 (1971).

We are passing through a period of general disillusionment in contemporary America. The successes to which we have become
accustomed since the founding of our country seem suddenly faltering. In contemporary America we are witnessing the alienation of the blacks and other minority groups (i.e., the university student and the young), the downgrading of law enforcement officials, the rise in crimes of violence, the steady decline of the influence of the church, particularly during the last seven years, the rise in unemployment and inflation, the fear of recession and the increasing cost of government. This has been accompanied, and in part possibly caused, by the dissatisfaction with and weakening of our international role and its awesome assumption of responsibility, and the disillusioning recognition of our limitations, both as a military and as an economic power. In general, we face an increased aggressiveness of the poor, the young, the dissatisfied and those who have suffered discrimination, involving the issues of poverty, racism, war and peace, accompanied by a reciprocal and increasing resentment of those against whom aggressiveness has been vented.

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We are passing through a period of general disillusionment in
contemporary America. The successes to which we have become
accustomed since the founding of our country seem suddenly faltering.
In contemporary America we are witnessing the alienation of
the blacks and other minority groups (i.e., the university student and
the young), the downgrading of law enforcement officials, the rise
in crimes of violence, the steady decline of the influence of the
church, particularly during the last seven years, the rise in unemployment
and inflation, the fear of recession and the increasing cost
of government. This has been accompanied, and in part possibly
caused, by the dissatisfaction with and weakening of our international
role and its awesome assumption of responsibility, and the
disillusioning recognition of our limitations, both as a military and
as an economic power. In general, we face an increased aggressiveness
of the poor, the young, the dissatisfied and those who have suffered
discrimination, involving the issues of poverty, racism, war
and peace, accompanied by a reciprocal and increasing resentment
of those against whom aggressiveness has been vented.
At such a time it is understandable that young lawyers should
not find complete fulfillment in self-serving career-oriented activities
in the legal profession. Accordingly, many young lawyers have enlisted
in causes such as consumer protection in the demand for honesty
of product and honesty in advertising and in insistence upon
greater corporate assumption of responsibility in the public interest.
The word ecology has begun to assume awesome proportions.

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